Farmhouse Dining Room Table

I have been busy working down Bethany’s “honey-do” list since we moved into our new home.  There were quite a few woodworking projects on the list, including building a long farmhouse dining room table for our large family.  When I sat down to start drawing up the plans I asked her to provide me with pictures of tables similar to what she had in mind.  Bethany only provided me with one example, a picture from Chip and Joanna Gaines’ website:

The Chip and Joanna Gaines table that provided the inspiration for our design.

The table was made for a couple with 7 children (Allen and Gail Holt) on an episode titled “Fixer Upper: Yours, Mine, Ours, and a Home on the River”.  It was built by Clint Harp with Harp Design Co. and met Bethany’s design guidelines of simple, rugged, and LARGE.

Just to be clear, I didn’t have plans for the table above and had to design our table from scratch using Google Sketchup.  I’m not sure of the dimensions of their table but two obvious modifications I made were to use a 4×4 for the beam under the benches instead of a 2×2 and I also made the benches have symmetrical boards instead of one larger and one smaller board.  We also opted to stain our table with Minwax Ebony instead of painting it white.  We both like the white version but thought a darker table would look better in our dining room.  Let us know if you agree!

The goal of this post is to provide sufficient instruction so that even a novice will have all the information required to build this table from scratch.  The plans are free on just two conditions:
  1. if you use these plans please share this post on Pinterest, Facebook, or another social media site AND
  2. leave a comment here letting us know you built this table.

Here are the instructions to build this farmhouse dining room table:

Tools and Materials:

Lumber:

I placed my order for lumber on Lowes.com.  I made a note that I would be using the wood for a furniture project and was extremely happy with the wood they pulled for me.  At the time of writing this the delivery fee was $76 (whether you have one board delivered or a large order…so try to get everything you need at the same time).  The subtotal for the lumber, before tax and delivery fee, was only $232.34 (thousands and thousands of dollars cheaper than purchasing a 16 foot table from a store!)

  • 4×4’s – Total of three 16’ posts, used to make the following table parts:
    • Angled Brace – 4×4 – 22 5/8”
    • Angled Brace – 4×4 – 22 5/8”
    • Angled Brace – 4×4 – 22 5/8”
    • Angled Brace – 4×4 – 22 5/8”
    • Table Legs Lower Support – 4×4 – 28”
    • Table Legs Lower Support – 4×4 – 28”
    • Table Legs Upper Support – 4×4 – 28”
    • Table Legs Upper Support – 4×4 – 28”
    • Table Lower Beam – 4×4 – 13’ 6”
    • Table Lower Beam Support – 4×4 – 5 ½”
    • Table Upper Beam – 4×4 – 12’ 11”
  • 2×4’s – Total of five 16’ boards
    • Inner Apron Support – 2×4 – 12’11”
    • Inner Apron Support – 2×4 – 12’11”
    • Outer Apron – 2×4 – 13’ 9”
    • Outer Apron – 2×4 – 13’ 9”
    • Table Legs Apron – 2×4 – 3’ 3”
    • Table Legs Apron – 2×4 – 3’ 3”
  • 2×12’s – Total of four 16’ boards
    • Table Top Board – 2×12 – 14’
    • Table Top Board – 2×12 – 14’
    • Table Top Board – 2×12 – 14’
    • Table Top Board – 2×12 – 14’
  • 6×6’s – Total of one 16’ post
    • Table Leg – 6×6 – 28 ½”
    • Table Leg – 6×6 – 28 ½”
    • Table Leg – 6×6 – 28 ½”
    • Table Leg – 6×6 – 28 ½”

I had planned to have Lowe’s deliver my order since I don’t have a vehicle large enough to pick up 16 foot long boards.  The delivery date was out a little further than I wanted so I ended up picking up all the wood using a Uhaul truck.  Here is a picture of the wood in the truck…this is all of the wood required to build the table:

Picking up the wood from Lowe's in a rented 17' U-Haul truck
Picking up the wood from Lowe’s in a rented 17′ U-Haul truck

Here is the wood unloaded into the garage:

Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_007Directions:

I will do my best to cover every step required to build this farmhouse dining room table but if you have any questions please leave a comment.

Step 01

First you need to build the ends for each side of the table:

Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_Step_01Start by making all the cuts.  I don’t have a saw that easily cuts 6×6 posts so I had to partially cut them in my miter saw and then flip them over to finish the cut.  Here are the all the pieces cut for the table ends:

6x6s and 4x4s cut for the table ends
6x6s and 4x4s cut for the table ends

Once the cuts are done you need to make the Kreg Jig HD pocket holes in the 4x4s:

Drill Kreg Jig HD pocket holes into the 4x4s
Drill Kreg Jig HD pocket holes into the 4x4s

You also need to make the notches in the lower 4×4 beams…here is a video showing how I did it:

Now it’s time to assemble the table ends.  I used a 1″ thick piece of wood as a guide on each side to help position the 4x4s in the center of the 6×6 legs:

Assemble the table ends using Kreg HD Pocket Hole Screws
Assemble the table ends using Kreg HD Pocket Hole Screws

Step 02

Once the ends are assembled you need to connect them to each other using the long 4×4 beams:

Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_Step_02I clamped a piece of wood to the 4x4s on the table ends so that I could set the long beam down on the temporary ledge while I fastened the segments using HD pocket screws.  Here are two pictures…one from above and one from below so you can see the positioning of the pocket holes:

Use clamps to make a temporary ledge while you connect the top long beam to the table end
Use clamps to make a temporary ledge while you connect the top long beam to the table end
I used one HD pocket hole on the topside and two HD pocket holes on the underside
I used one HD pocket hole on the topside and two HD pocket holes on the underside

Here is what it looks like when you are done with this step:

Finish connecting the top and bottom beams to the table ends
Finish connecting the top and bottom beams to the table ends

Note: The bottom beam is connected with 4″ wood screws from underneath going up into the beam from below.

Step 03

Once the ends are connected you need to add the supports for the beams:

Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_Step_03Unfortunately, I got busy building and forgot to take pictures of this specific task.  The important thing is to cut the pieces exactly the dimensions as specified in the Sketchup File and picture above.  I measured the pieces and would have cut them shorter but decided to try the Sketchup dimensions first.  The issue was that I had to have my wife and children lift the top beam up while I positioned and fasten the supports.  Once we did that they fit like a glove and the table seemed extremely strong after they were all attached.

Step 04

Now you can run the apron around the top of the table and add in two additional 2x4s for added support for the long table top boards:

Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_Step_04At this point the table starts to get EXTREMELY heavy!  We built the table in the room but ended up moving it outside to apply the stain.  It took our entire family to move the table outside…even before the top was installed.  Here is a picture with the 2×4 apron and center supports installed:

Attach the 2x4 aprons and center supports using wood screws
Attach the 2×4 aprons and center supports using wood screws through the sides

Here is a picture with the stain applied:

Its a good idea to go ahead and start applying the stain before the table gets to heavy to move
Its a good idea to go ahead and start applying the stain before the table gets to heavy to move

Step 05

You are almost done! The last step is to assemble the table top and attach it to the top of the farmhouse dining room table:

Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_Step_05Note: The steps below are in order but its important to notice that the pocket holes for connecting the table top are drilled BEFORE you put the tabletop boards on top of the table.

For this step I just laid all the boards down side by side on top of the table and attached them using Kreg HD Screws.  My wife stained all the boards BEFORE I connected them so that the stain would be down between the cracks of each board:

Lay the boards out on top of the table and then go ahead and apply the stain.
Lay the boards out on top of the table and then go ahead and apply the stain.
Connect the boards using HD Pocket Holes on alternating sides of each board
Connect the boards using HD Pocket Holes on alternating sides of each board

Once the table top boards were stained and attached to each other I spent a long time making sure the table top was positioned square on top of the table.  I’m sure there is a better way but I just kept taking measurements until I was satisfied it was centered and square.  I then clamped the tabletop down and attached it using the Kreg Jig Pocket Holes from underneath:

This is a great reference picture showing the placement of the pocket holes underneath the table
This is a great reference picture showing the placement of the pocket holes underneath the table

I waited to cut the boards to length until they were already attached to the top of the table.   I placed a piece of wood parallel with each end to use as a guide.  I then ran a circular saw along the guide to cut each side of the table to the desired length.

I waited to cut the ends until I could see the completed table in the actual room. We had to stain the ends but it was worth it to have it tailor fit for the dimensions of the room.
I waited to cut the ends until I could see the completed table in the actual room. We had to stain the ends again but it was worth it to have it tailor fit to the dimensions of the room.

Our table is 186 inches long but it can easily be a couple feet longer or shorter depending on how much of an overhang you desire and what fits well in the dimensions of your room.  Here are some pictures of the completed table in our dining room:

Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_043 Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_044 Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse Dining Room Table 045 Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_052 Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_098 Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_099

Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_209 Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_210 Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_211 Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_213 Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Table_214 Wholesteading-com_Farmhouse_Dining_Room_Table_215If you love this farmhouse dining room table then please put your love into action by sharing this on Pinterest or Facebook.

Thanks!

Anthony and Bethany

PS – Many people have reached out asking us to post the plans for the benches.  When we have more time we will try to come back and give more detailed instructions but here are some dimensions and pictures that should help:

Dimensions for benches:

Pictures of the building process:

Step 1 – Cut all the support pieces. The single piece on top is a 1 inch segment of a 4×4 post that I used as a spacer.
Step 2 – Clamp all the bottom support pieces together, cut out a 3.5 inch wide section by running a circular saw over the middle section with the depth of the saw set to 1″ below the guard and then use a chisel to smooth out the cut out area
Step 3 – Make the Kreg Jig HD pocket holes

Step 4 – Layout the pieces and place down the spacer so that the 2×4 piece will rest 1 inch off the ground
Step 5 – Position the 2×4 support piece using the spacers
Step 6 – Use clamps to hold the pieces in their proper positions and then fasten them using HD pocket hole screws

Step 7 – Flip the entire assembly over and then drive a couple long wood screws into the supports to fasten the long bottom beam in place.

If you have any questions on the benches please leave a comment below and we will update this post with the answer.

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8 thoughts on “Farmhouse Dining Room Table”

    1. I designed it myself in sketchup. Are you wanting to build it? If so, let me know and I’ll try to write a post with instructions soon.

  1. This is an incredible project, thanks for sharing the details. I’m looking into getting a Kreg jig for a much smaller project, floating wood shelves. Perhaps one day I can attempt something a little larger. 😉

    You and your wife have done an amazing job with your home. Congratulations.

    1. Ian, I can post the plans for the benches if you are planning to build them. Let me know and I will try to have the plans posted by this weekend. Thanks, Anthony

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